Genes linked to death from sepsis ID’d in mice

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition that occurs when the body’s immune response to infection spirals out of control. Bacteria in the bloodstream trigger immune cells to release powerful molecules called cytokines to quickly activate the body’s defenses. Sometimes the response goes overboard, creating a so-called “cytokine storm” that leaves people feverish or chilled, disoriented and in pain. In severe cases, […]

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New technique helps create more personalized therapies for people with advanced cancers

Being able to identify targets for adoptive cell therapies is one of the first steps in developing personalized treatments for people with hard-to-treat cancers. However, predicting whether a patient will have an immune response to a particular abnormal protein caused by mutations that serves as a new antigen (neoantigen), can be challenging. Using an ultra-sensitive and high-throughput isolation technology (termed […]

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Helping paramedics recognize signs of stroke faster

When it comes to strokes, doctors have a mantra: time is brain. Delaying treatment even by minutes can mean the difference between a normal life and permanent disability, or even life and death. That’s why J. Adam Oostema, a Michigan State University College of Human Medicine associate professor of emergency medicine, led a study to shorten the time to treatment. […]

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Biomaterial-delivered chemotherapy leads to long-term survival in brain cancer

A combination of chemotherapy drugs during brain cancer surgery using a biodegradable paste, leads to long-term survival, researchers at the University of Nottingham have discovered. In a new study published in Clinical Cancer Research, scientists found a significant survival benefit in rat models with brain tumours when a combination of two chemotherapy drugs, (etoposide and temozolomide), were delivered using a […]

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Research identifies new pathways for sensory learning in the brain

We’ve all heard the saying that individuals learn at their own pace. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed an automated, robotic training device that allows mice to learn at their leisure. The technology stands to further neuroscience research by allowing researchers to train animals under more natural conditions and identify mechanisms of circuit rewiring that occur during learning. A […]

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Test shown to improve accuracy in identifying precancerous pancreatic cysts

In a proof-of-concept study, an international scientific team led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers has shown that a laboratory test using artificial intelligence tools has the potential to more accurately sort out which people with pancreatic cysts will go on to develop pancreatic cancers. The test, dubbed CompCyst (for comprehensive cyst analysis), incorporates measures of molecular and clinical […]

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CDC is on alert for the rare, paralyzing condition known as AFM

Minnesota, which found itself at the center of a national mystery over the rare polio-like disorder known as AFM last year, has reported no cases so far in 2019. This year is supposed to be a down year, based on the every-other-year pattern of the condition, but federal health officials nonetheless issued a warning earlier this month. That’s because AFM […]

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Dementia and transitional care: Gaps in research and practice

Patients with dementia are hospitalized at higher rates and involved in transitional care more frequently than those who are cognitively unimpaired. Yet, current practices for managing transitional care—and the research informing them—have overlooked the needs of patients with dementia and their caregivers. “Patients with dementia have only been considered in a small portion of decades of transitional care studies,” said […]

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Reducing seizures by removing newborn neurons

Removing new neurons born after a brain injury reduces seizures in mice, according to new research in JNeurosci. This approach could potentially help prevent post-injury epilepsy. New neurons generated following a brain injury often do not develop normally. Left untreated, these cells may contribute to the development of epilepsy. Jenny Hsieh and colleagues at the University of Texas at San […]

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Many perceive lack of choice in receipt of RAI for thyroid cancer

(HealthDay)—Many patients diagnosed with differentiated thyroid cancer perceive that they have no choice about receiving radioactive iodine (RAI), according to a study published online July 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Lauren P. Wallner, Ph.D., M.P.H., from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues surveyed 2,632 eligible patients diagnosed with differentiated thyroid cancer from 2014 to 2015. […]

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