Bladder drug linked to atherosclerosis in mice

A drug used in the treatment of overactive bladder can accelerate atherosclerosis in mice, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report in a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). According to the researchers, the results suggest that in some cases, the drug might potentially increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in humans. […]

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Hypnosis to tackle painkiller crisis

New research shows that hypnosis can reduce pain by up to 42% and may offer a genuine alternative to painkillers. A project led by psychologist Dr. Trevor Thompson of the University of Greenwich found that hypnosis is more effective with people who are especially amenable to suggestion. But it also found that those who are moderately suggestible – essentially most […]

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UCLA researcher aims to study societal impacts of cannabis

In the 15 months since the recreational sale of marijuana became legal for adults in California, an explosion of new cannabis-based products, unchecked health claims and slick advertisements has bombarded the state. Anticipating the accompanying social impacts, UCLA established the UCLA Cannabis Research Initiative, known as the CRI, in 2017 as one of the first academic programs in the world […]

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Long-term treatment with antidepressants may not be justified by available studies

A new study published in the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics sheds new light on long-term studies with antidepressant drugs. The higher occurrence of relapse in the groups assigned to placebo instead of drug continuation may be due to the studies not considering the potential occurrence of withdrawal syndromes. In this first systematic review of psychotropic drug discontinuation in […]

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Antiepileptic drugs not tied to dementia risk

(HealthDay)—Antiepileptic drug (AED) use is not significantly associated with dementia risk in patients in Germany, according to a study published online March 12 in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. Louis Jacob, Ph.D., from the University of Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines in France, and colleagues examined the association between AED use and dementia risk among 50,575 cases with dementia and 50,575 controls without […]

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FDA Expands Indication for Soliqua 100/33 (insulin glargine and lixisenatide injection) to Include Type 2 Diabetes Patients Uncontrolled on Oral Antidiabetic Medicines

BRIDGEWATER, N.J., Feb. 27, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the expanded use of Soliqua 100/33 (insulin glargine and lixisenatide injection) 100 Units/mL and 33 mcg/mL. Previously approved for use as an add-on to diet and exercise in adults with type 2 diabetes who are uncontrolled on long-acting insulin or lixisenatide, Soliqua 100/33 can […]

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FDA Approves Lonsurf (trifluridine/tipiracil) for Adult Patients with Previously Treated Advanced Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction (GEJ) Adenocarcinoma

PRINCETON, N.J., February 25, 2019 – Taiho Oncology, Inc. today announced that the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Lonsurf as a treatment for adult patients with metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma previously treated with at least two prior lines of chemotherapy that included a fluoropyrimidine, a platinum, either a taxane or irinotecan, and if appropriate, […]

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VLP Therapeutics Receives FDA Clearance of Investigational New Drug Application and Initiates First Clinical Trial of VLPM01 Malaria Vaccine

Gaithersburg, MD – February 4, 2019 —  VLP Therapeutics today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared an investigational new drug (IND) application for a clinical trial of the Company’s VLPM01 malaria vaccine. The Phase I/IIa clinical trial has begun recruiting participants in February 2019, and is designed to assess the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of […]

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Common opioids less effective for patients on SSRI antidepressants, study finds

Patients taking the most common form of antidepressant who are given the most widely prescribed opioid experience less pain relief, Stanford University School of Medicine investigators have discovered. The finding could help combat the opioid epidemic, as poorly managed pain may lead to opioid abuse. As many as 1 in 6 Americans takes antidepressants, mostly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Stanford […]

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