Merck Foundation to fund professorships for early-career physician-scientists

The Merck Foundation has made a $2 million commitment to Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis to establish two endowed assistant professorships supporting early-career physician-scientists from populations that are historically underrepresented in medicine and biomedical sciences. Named for Roger M. Perlmutter, MD, PhD, a graduate of Washington University’s Medical Scientist Training Program who later went on to lead […]

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NIH awards 4 medical school scientists prestigious ‘high-risk, high-reward’ grants

Four scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have been awarded prestigious grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) aimed at supporting the researchers’ innovative and impactful biomedical and behavioral research. The grants are among a total of 106 such grants awarded to scientists recognized via the NIH Common Fund’s High-Risk, High-Reward Research program. The program […]

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What are the Health Effects of Loneliness?

Loneliness is a subjective feeling associated with a lack of social interactions in combination with several internal factors relating to personality. Increasingly, loneliness is becoming viewed as a risk factor for several major negative health outcomes. Image Credit: Jorm S/Shutterstock.com Social isolation and loneliness are both sources of chronic stress and hypervigilance that lead to reduced sleep quality, physiological changes […]

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Vaccination in Humanitarian Settings

Humanitarian emergencies can significantly disrupt healthcare systems, which has many negative outcomes, including the breakdown of regular vaccination programs. In low to mid-income countries, where humanitarian emergencies are more common, the impact of such emergencies on healthcare systems can be more pronounced, affecting these populations more dramatically. In particular, displaced populations such as refugees are more at risk of missing […]

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Fall-prevention program can help reduce harmful in-home falls by nearly 40%

For many aging Americans, the dream of maintaining an active, independent lifestyle while living at home comes crashing down with a fall. Falls are the leading cause of injury, accidental death and premature placement in a nursing home among older adults in the United States. Now, new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that in-home […]

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Antibodies elicited by COVID-19 vaccination effective against delta variant

Despite causing a surge in infections this summer that has resulted in thousands of hospitalizations and deaths, the delta variant of the virus that causes COVID-19 is not particularly good at evading the antibodies generated by vaccination, according to a study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The researchers analyzed a panel of antibodies generated […]

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COVID-19 and the Gastrointestinal Tract

The novel severe acute respiratory virus (SARS-COV-2), responsible for the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, is primarily known for its ability to wreak havoc on the respiratory systems of infected individuals. In addition to this, various gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms have been identified in subsets of affected patients. Image Credit: Magic3D/Shutterstock.com GI symptoms of COVID-19 Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is known to cause […]

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Antipsychotics and Heat Stroke

Antipsychotic medications can impairer the body’s ability to regulate its own temperature and hot weather can lead to hyperthermia (heat stroke). Antipsychotic medications are used to treat psychosis in a variety of psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, personality disorder, and agitation in dementia. However, some antipsychotics are also used to treat unrelated issues such as persistent […]

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Sex Differences in Infectious Diseases

Disease-causing pathogens encounter different host characteristics – age, physiology, nutritional status, and immune response are some basic differences which pathogens confront. However, the most striking contrast which the pathogens encounter is the gender of the host species. Women and men are different in many aspects. The interesting fact is that these differences are also observed in their risk of contracting […]

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4 physician-scientists named Dean’s Scholars

The Division of Physician-Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has selected four physicians for its second class of Dean’s Scholars. The program provides up to two years of financial support and mentorship to aspiring, early-career physician-scientists, along with dedicated time for conducting laboratory research. The newly named class includes: Mary “Maggie” Mullen, MD; Matthew Shew, MD; […]

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